People

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People

Improving societies together.
Worldwide.

Understanding complex social problems is easier when data scientists, social scientists, humanists, and other difference makers can be assembled around the same table. It also means drawing from diverse methods, theories, and perspectives.

At the Cline Center for Advanced Social Research, we’re building an innovative community of scholars who not only pursue collaborative text analytics research using our data, software, and expertise, but are deeply invested in promoting societal well-being. The Cline Center affiliates network includes faculty, students, and staff from six colleges at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and from collaborating institutions spread across five continents. 

The Cline Center is a collaborative enterprise that draws faculty, staff, students, and difference-makers from the public and private sectors into interdisciplinary research projects that address real-world problems. Core staff and faculty members working in our Research Park location manage day-to-day operations involving faculty fellows, graduate fellows, research assistants, interns, and analysts. We also support collaborative projects through our network of faculty and research affiliates spanning the Urbana-Champaign campus as well as other institutions across the globe. 

Here’s who is making a difference with the Cline Center.

Rebeca Joan Agosto Rosa
Rebeca Joan Agosto Rosa
Schroeder Fellow
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Rebeca plans to use the Cline Center’s Global News Archive to analyze media portrayals of immigrants in the U.S. Her goal is to better understand the use of stereotypical and counter-stereotypical depictions and their impact on immigration-related attitudes.

Sarah Leffingwell
Sarah Leffingwell
Schroeder Fellow
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Sarah Leffingwell studies the behavior of new democracies in international treaties. Her project for the Schroeder Fellowship focuses on identifying the mechanism through which new democracies use international treaties to increase their domestic support levels. By examining the frequency and content of news articles following a country signing an international treaty, she hopes to discover how the national media is used to broadcast the government's participation in treaties, and how those broadcasts impact what individuals think about their government's performance. This project is part of her larger dissertation project identifying how and why new democracies behave differently than more established democracies in their international relations.